World’s fastest motorbikes

Dodge Tomahawk, 350 mph (560 km/h)

The Dodge Tomahawk is a Viper V-10 based motorcycle– a 500 horsepower engine with four wheels. The two front wheels and two rear wheels, make it look like a motorized quadricycle rather than a typical motorcycle. According to official specifications 0-60 mph times have been estimated at 1.75 seconds, with a top speed of 350 mph. But there are also reports that the top speed is 676 km/h (about 420 mph). Chrysler sold nine replicas through Neiman Marcus, for up to $555,000 each. The motorcycles cannot be legally driven on public roads. The unusual vehicle was launched at the 2003 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan.

Suzuki Hayabusa, 248 mph (397 km/h)

The name Hayabusa translates directly from the Japanese as Pergerine Falcon, the bird commonly attributed of achieving speeds of over 200 mph (322 km/h) and predator of the common blackbird. The name is a subtle reference to Honda’s competing Hawk models. When introduced in 1999, it overtook the Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird as the fastest production motorcycle. The first generation of the Hayabusa was called the GSX1300R and was powered by a 1299 cc (79.2 cu in) inline-4 liquid-cooled engine. The bike made famous in India by the bollywood movie Dhoom will officially be launched in the country in September. Although boasting of a top speed of 397 km per hour as per recorded figures, the bike that will come to India will have a speed limit of 299 km per hour and will sport a price tag of Rs 11 lakh (1.1 million). In the US, the 2008 model will boast a price tag of $11,999.

Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird, 190mph (310km/h)

Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird was the world’s fastest production motorcycle, after ripping the title away from the legendary Kawasaki ZX-11. Production of the Blackbird began in 1996 and halted in late 2007. The Blackbird was last imported to North America in 2003.

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11/ZZ-R1100, 176 mph (283km/h)

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11/ZZ-R1100 was produced from 1990-2001. It was marketed as the ZX-11 Ninja in North America and the ZZ-R1100 in the rest of the world. This bike held the crown of The World’s Fastest Production Bike for close to a decade with a record top speed of 283 km/h (176 mph). When the bike was introduced in 1990, the nearest production bike top speed was 16 km/h (10 mph) slower and it belonged to the ZX-10, the bike that Kawasaki was replacing with the ZX-11.

BMW K 1200 S, 174 mph (280 km/h)

With enough raw power to shock even the most seasoned adrenaline junky, the K 1200 S hurls you from a dead stop to sixty mph in just 2.8 seconds. On 25 September 2004, BMW globally launched a radically redesigned K Series motorcycle, the K 1200 S, containing an all new in-line four-cylinder, liquid-cooled engine featuring 123 kW (165 hp). After the launch of K 1200 S, BMW unveiled the K 1200 R naked roadster, and the K 1200 GT sport tourer.

BUB Enterprises Streamliner

Wondering what this craft that resembles a rocket doing over here? Well this weird looking vehicle held the title of ‘the world’s fastest motorbike’ in 2006. Chris Carr, 7-time AMA Grand National Champion, piloted the BUB Enterprises Streamliner to a record 350.884 MPH at the 2006 International Motorcycle Speed Trials held at Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah September 7. Christened ‘Seven’ by owner Dennis Manning (it being the seventh streamliner Manning has designed in 40 odd years), the fastest motorcycle in the world features a purpose-designed and engineered V-Four cylinder turbo charged 16 valve liquid cooled double overhead cam motor.

Advertisements

4 Responses to World’s fastest motorbikes

  1. Alex says:

    I found your site on technorati and read a few of your other posts. Keep up the good work. I just added your RSS feed to my Google News Reader. Looking forward to reading more from you down the road!

  2. BigBan says:

    Oh, Thanks! Really amazing. Greets.

  3. britt borden says:

    I truly enjoy reading your blog as the postings are so easy to interpret and follow. Excellent. Keep up the great work. Ciao.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: